Channel - Social Sciences
5/6/2022 11:26:19 AM

Channel Videos

"Shout up at the back if you can't hear me!"" part 2: Making lecture capture accessible, using the microphone
This clip explains briefly about using the microphone/microphones successfully to enable everyone to hear you and to ensure the best recording for lecture capture.
Default Presenter
10/10/2018 8:10:36 AM
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"Shout up at the back if you can't hear me!": Making lectures more accessible
Have you ever stood at the front of a class and asked, "Can you hear me at the back?"? If so this short video is for you.
Default Presenter
10/10/2018 8:01:56 AM
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Enhancing your use of grademark
Some brief hints and tips for you to enhance the feedback you offer to students via Grademark.
Default Presenter
10/10/2018 10:10:32 AM
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European Centre for the Responsibility to Protect 2022 Annual Lecture
The 2022 ECR2P Annual Lecture is from Alice Wairimu Nderitu, UN Special Advisor to the Secretary-General on the Prevention of Genocide, on the topic 'Bringing prevention to the village: key challenges and opportunities'. The lecture is introduced by ECR2P Co-Director, Dr Cristina Stefan.
Default Presenter
4/7/2022 6:03:56 PM
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MA Social Research (Interdisciplinary) Induction
Introduction to the White Rose Doctoral Training Partnership (WRDTP) Presenter: Professor Edward Newman
Default Presenter
9/22/2021 12:03:00 PM
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PIED3790 Yr2 UG Dissertation Workshop (4 May 2022)_5/4/2022
University of Leeds
5/4/2022 1:08:02 PM
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POLIS Global Research Series Seminar: "American Philosophical Pragmatism and Global International Relations: Obstacles and Opportunities"
To launch our new Global Research Series, Professor Jason Ralph will speak about 'American Philosophical Pragmatism and Global International Relations: Obstacles and Opportunities'. The School of Politics and International Studies is organising a new Global Research Series 2022 for the first time with partner universities from around the world. This promises to be a great opportunity for academic networking and the exchange of views on contemporary issues of critical importance. We welcome your participation and contribution to this unique intellectual endeavour. The POLIS Global Research Series is led by Dr. Adam Tyson.
Professor Jason Ralph
1/24/2022 4:54:05 PM
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POLIS Global Research Series Seminar: "Stigma management in the age of terror: Local responses to the US-led religious moderation project in Indonesia after 9/11"
In the third talk in our Global Research Series, Dr Rizky Alif Alvian gives the talk 'Stigma management in the age of terror: Local responses to the US-led religious moderation project in Indonesia after 9/11' The School of Politics and International Studies is organising a new Global Research Series 2022 for the first time with partner universities from around the world. This promises to be a great opportunity for academic networking and the exchange of views on contemporary issues of critical importance. We welcome your participation and contribution to this unique intellectual endeavour. The POLIS Global Research Series is led by Dr. Adam Tyson.
Default Presenter
3/28/2022 8:00:51 AM
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POLIS Global Research Series Seminar: "US perceptions of China’s threat to the liberal international order"
In the second talk in our Global Research Series, Professor Kenneth Holland of Jindal Global University will speak about 'US perceptions of China's threat to the liberal international order'. The School of Politics and International Studies is organising a new Global Research Series 2022 for the first time with partner universities from around the world. This promises to be a great opportunity for academic networking and the exchange of views on contemporary issues of critical importance. We welcome your participation and contribution to this unique intellectual endeavour. The POLIS Global Research Series is led by Dr. Adam Tyson.
Default Presenter
2/21/2022 10:56:27 AM
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POLIS Research Seminar Series - "Contextualising Crisis at Eskom"
Postgraduate Researcher Ruth Bookbinder presented this talk as part of the Research Seminar Series hosted by the School of Politics and International Studies. Abstract The presentation examines professional practices at Eskom to demonstrate how they enable predatory rent-seeking. According to the company’s 2020 Integrated Report, Eskom’s debt was valued at over US$29 billion, requiring government bailouts and underlining the extent of the company’s financial predicament. I consider the role of the employees that facilitate transactions to draw out the norms and moral economy that informs their participation in rent-seeking networks as necessary but secondary actors. I conclude that it is not that employees approve of – or even accept – corruption. Instead, the costs of opposing these transactions and responsibility to personal networks outweigh the societal duty to resist or expose predatory rent-seeking practices.
Default Presenter
2/10/2021 10:19:17 AM
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POLIS Research Seminar Series - "Playing for Hate? Extremism, Terrorism and Videogames"
Playing for Hate? Extremism, Terrorism and Videogames [PLEASE NOTE - CONTAINS DEPICTIONS OF VIOLENCE, STRONG LANGUAGE] Dr Nick Robinson presented this talk as part of the Research Seminar Series hosted by the School of Politics and International Studies. Abstract Although the production of videogames by extremist and terrorist groups has markedly declined since a high point in the 2000s, game-based interventions remain highly significant, whether through the adoption of gaming-based iconography in extremist and terrorist social media campaigns or through the activity of modders and groups’ supporters who continue to make games championing extremists and terrorists. Building on Conway’s 2017 call to look anew at the nexus between violent extremism, terrorism, and the internet, we problematize existing work on the use of videogames by extremists and terrorists. First, we argue that research needs to move beyond viewing games as tools for recruitment: seeing videogames as sources of propaganda that work to reinforce the views of those already empathetic to and/or attuned to a group’s messages significantly expands our understanding of the interrelationship between players and extremist and terrorist videogames. Second, we argue that the present literature – whilst impressive – has overly privileged the “reading” of in-game representations, at the expense of attention to the central role of interactive gameplay in promoting the strategic communication and propaganda aims of a group. It is through the undertaking of in-game actions that a player comes to experience a group’s values and aims. Research on videogames, extremism and terrorism is at a nascent stage – this paper seeks to provoke further thinking and open up spaces for debate in this crucial, yet under-studied, area.
Dr Nick Robinson
2/17/2021 1:00:31 PM
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POLIS Research Seminar Series: "Emoji as emotional proxies in social movement social media"
Postgraduate Researcher Daniel Valdenegro presented this online seminar on 4 November 2020 as part of the School of Politics and International Studies research seminar series. Abstract: In this project my goal is to analyse the evolution of social movements using social media data, identifying the factors that lead to their success, failure and levels of radicalization, using the digital footprint of said social movements, namely tweets or comments on other social media. The main factor to be analysed is the emotional content of the communications associated with these social movements. Emotions are an essential part of the motivational process and as such very important to understanding human and social behaviour. Examples of this are the key role of emotions in motivating participation in activism, or the influence of certain emotions on attitudes towards contingent topics such as immigration, climate change or racism. However, its use in computational social science is less prevalent than its cousin, sentiment analysis, which has the big limitation that most of the lexicons are only available in English, significantly limiting the scope of the analysis. However, social media text may itself have the solution for this problem. Many comments and tweets are already being labelled in terms of their emotional valence using emojis or special characters. This tagging system was born as a way around the limitations of online communication to convey emotional states and more subtle subtext communications. Consequently, these emojis and hashtags can be taken as the emotional label of a piece of text, to be used later to train a machine learning model on the recognition of these emotions. This approach will allow me to study not only English speaking social movements but also Portuguese and Spanish speaking social movements, now common in Latin America. This study collects data from Twitter streaming API, which has a large and very varied international user base. The data was selected using a series of keywords and hashtags related to the social movements of interest in Europe, USA and Latin America.
Valdenegro Daniel
11/4/2020 1:00:29 PM
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POLIS Research Seminar Series: "Green Party Member Activism in 2018/2019 – the gentrification of protest"
Postgraduate Researcher Chantal Sullivan-Thomsett presented this talk as part of the Research Seminar Series hosted by the School of Politics and International Studies. Abstract Which of the following are true facts about the German Green Party? 1. It was an erstwhile protest party. 2. It was a former national government coalition partner. 3. Baden-Württemberg, home to Mercedes Benz, is the first German state to have a Green state prime minister. 4. They were the second largest party in Germany in the 2019 EU elections. The answer is: all of them. These are all traits of the past and present German Greens. Despite the professionalisation of the Greens leading them to the political centre, the party and its membership still genuinely support, encourage and take part in ecological and social protests and demonstrations that often lead to criticism and accusations of hypocrisy. Based on nine months of ethnographic fieldwork in Berlin, Kiel and Stuttgart, this paper will examine the activism of Green Party members in both party and protest movements during a period of unprecedented electoral success at state and European level, and amongst the emergence of the Fridays for Future movement. Through an interpretive analysis highlighting the links between locality, history and perception, this paper will introduce how Green Party involvement in protest could illustrate a gentrification of protest.
Chantal Sullivan-Thomsett
2/3/2021 1:00:51 PM
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POLIS Research Seminar Series: "Implementing the Prevent duty - conceptualisation of threat within Greater Manchester’s Further Education sector"
Dr Natalie James presented this seminar on 2 December 2020 as part of the School of Politics and International Studies research seminar series. https://essl.leeds.ac.uk/politics/pgr/639/natalie-james
Natalie James, Postgraduate Researcher, POLIS
12/2/2020 1:00:15 PM
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POLIS Research Seminar Series: "Marginalisation and power dynamics in river governance"
Postgraduate Researcher Shivani Singhal presented this talk as part of the Research Seminar series hosted by the School of Politics and International Studies. Water governance of river Yamuna in Delhi and how it is deliberately being used to further marginalise sections of the community will be discussed in the seminar. Today, 70% of India’s rivers are polluted. India has been taking steps for environmental protection since 1972 after the United Nations Stockholm Conference. However, it has ranked 168/180 in the Environmental Performance Index. Rivers are used for development, livelihood, and cultural purposes. As a result, their toxic nature becomes a pressing matter. This is mainly due to governance failures and not technological shortages. While water governance is as old as the civilisation itself, there has been a shift in the global discourse from the government to governance. Water governance includes both formal and informal structures where political, social, economic, administrative, and cultural systems develop and manage water resources. This change is based on the multilevel, polycentric system involving many actors. As a result, there is a need to evaluate social and institutional interdependencies. The currently followed heavy scientific top-down approach fails to take in the on-ground socio-political realities of day-to-day negotiations around the Yamuna and its pollution of the marginalised and vulnerable section of the society. This leads to fragmented results. There is no space for the very marginalised that are being affected by the pollution to be heard in the linear governance structure. Moreover, despite contrary evidence, they become the targets of clean river initiatives.
Default Presenter
12/9/2020 12:30:30 PM
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POLIS Research Seminar Series: "Nostalgia for the end of history - anti-populism in contemporary British politics"
Dr Jonathan Dean, co-director of the Centre for Democratic Engagement, delivered this talk on anti-populism in contemporary British politics on 14 October 2020, as part of the research seminar series hosted by the School of Politics & International Studies' (POLIS).
Dr Jonathan Dean
10/14/2020 12:00:36 PM
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POLIS Research Seminar Series: "On Global Learning - Pragmatism, International Practice and the Challenge of Global Governance"
In this seminar, presented on 21 October 2020 as part of the School of Politics and International Studies research seminar series, Professor Jason Ralph introduces the main themes of his current book project, which aims to answer two questions: what does the classical American Pragmatism of Jane Addams, John Dewey and others mean for debates in contemporary International Relations (IR), especially those relating to the ‘practice turn’; and how does that help us meet contemporary global security, health and climate challenges? In this wide-ranging presentation, Jason will focus on the Pragmatist ‘temperament’; the centrality of emotions and experience to its analysis; the value it places on ‘fallibilism’, ‘sympathy’ and ‘conscientious reflection’; and how these underpin an engaged and deliberative form of democratic pedagogy committed to an ongoing process of social inquiry and learning. This is then used to critique international practices in the fields of security and climate governance.
Professor Jason Ralph
10/21/2020 12:00:10 PM
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POLIS Research Seminar Series: "Rent, asset value and the politics of patriarchy"
Dr Charlie Dannreuther, lecturer in European Political Economy, presented this seminar on 25 November 2020 as part of the School of Politics and International Studies research seminar series. Abstract: How has assetization, “the rendering of resources into new tradable income streams through processes of enclosure”, changed the way we value our lives, things and livelihoods? How has the protection of asset values changed political preference? Drawing from Kuwait as an exemplar, we establish some of the key features of rent circulation, social conservatism and state policy that characterise rentier states to show how the growth of interest in asset categories in recent years has changed the circulation of rent in the UK. Assets retain their value through the circulation of rent through rights that define political community and preference. As assets come under greater usage, or as communities start to become less cohesive, pressure to reinforce asset value is reinforced in conservative political agendas. Thus more patriarchy in patriarchal systems, more class in class based systems. The argument is illustrated by juxtaposing the experiences of Kuwait with those of the UK.
Charles Dannreuther ipicd@leeds.ac.uk
11/25/2020 1:00:45 PM
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POLIS Research Seminar Series: "The Politics of Climate Change"
Professor Richard Beardsworth discusses political response to climate science and political vision regarding climate change. This seminar took place on 18 November 2020 as part of the School of Politics and International Studies research seminar series. Abstract: The two concerns are necessarily interrelated; I separate them here for clarity’s sake. I consider, first, the politics of climate change in the terms of political response to climate science. The recommendation of the IPCC 2018 report that minimalizing future climate harm now requires no more than a global average temperature increase of 1.5°C posed squarely that climate change is a political problem and that this problem is one of time and scale (hence the large social movements demanding ‘climate action now’ following the report). To respond in time and at scale requires the exclusive power, leverage and identity of the state. A state-focused understanding of the global challenge of climate change is therefore necessary, whatever the importance of other domestic and international actors (IOs, businesses, cities, NGOs, etc.). I discuss the major reasons for this in terms of the state’s monopoly of violence, its powers of steerage, coordination and integration, its ability to motivate citizens, and to deliver justice. To emphasize the powers of the state at this unprecedented historical juncture is not however to fetishize them. There are large, historically embedded differences in state power across the world, further exacerbated by the multiplier effect of climate harm. To argue forcefully for the state at this historical juncture can only be done, therefore, within a larger vision that simultaneously transcends the state. The second more speculative part of my talk addresses the politics of climate change from the perspective of this political vision. Without confusing climate change and sustainability, I argue that all states are now in (sustainable) development and that this world-wide spectrum of developing states provides an opportunity to re-imagine the politics of development among them. The overall purpose of my argument is therefore to tie the political responsibility of the state (and state leadership) to large-scale domestic and international transformation.
Professor Richard Beardsworth
11/18/2020 1:00:32 PM
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POLIS Research Seminar Series: “Does the state of exception secure sovereignty?”
Postgraduate Researcher Sam Mace presented this talk as part of the Research Seminar Series hosted by the School of Politics and International Studies. The model of the state of exception that the paper uses is Carl Schmitt’s. Scholars such as Wolin (1990) and Suganami (2007) have noted his famous quotation “Sovereign is he who decides on the exception” (Schmitt pg. 4 2005). This is accompanied by Schmitt’s claim of the ‘sovereign god’ who can create ‘miracles’ by overriding the state at will, therefore placing sovereignty in the hands of the sovereign who can affect concrete change (Baume 2009). The model of sovereignty the paper uses is based off Caporaso’s model of sovereign features. Caporaso (2000) locates his sovereign features within the Westphalian framework i.e. states possessing ultimate sovereignty inside their own territorial borders. The sovereign traits that Caporaso outlines are power, territoriality, authority, and citizenship. The paper argues that by using the exception on a regular basis this undermines these sovereign traits and thus undermines sovereignty. The paper also adopts Benjamin’s critique of Schmitt’s sovereign god. Thiem (2013) highlights that Benjamin’s critique of the omnipotent god due to the weakness of man no one person could possibly that position (Thiem 2013). By exercising decisionism, the 'sovereign god' is unable to fulfil the sovereign traits necessary to effectively exercise sovereignty over a state.
Default Presenter
1/4/2021 4:40:40 PM
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POLIS Research Seminar Series: Tackling Neglected Tropical Infectious Diseases in South America
Dr Markus Fraundorfer presented this talk as part of the Research Seminar Series hosted by the School of Politics and International Studies. Title: Tackling Neglected Tropical Infectious Diseases in South America: The Role of Extra-Regional Global Health Governance Actors Abstract: Neglected tropical infectious diseases (NTIDs), such as Chagas disease, leishmaniasis, malaria, dengue, chikungunya and zika, are serious public health challenges in South America, presenting major social and economic burdens for all states in the region. Regional cooperation on a wide range of cross-border challenges in the region is traditionally weak. And no regional organization in South or Latin America has achieved to bring together the states of the region on NTIDs. Even the UNASUR Health Council, which became a crucial regional cooperation mechanism on health issues over the last decade, never prioritized NTIDs. Despite this lack of regional cooperation mechanisms on NTIDs, this chapter argues that over the last three decades complex regional governance arrangements emerged which significantly advanced research and development on several NTIDs endemic in the region. These regional governance arrangements were facilitated by extra-regional organizations, such as the WHO, PAHO and the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi). Given their reflexive authority on combating NTIDs, these organizations created a complex regional governance architecture that allowed governmental and non-governmental actors from South American countries to strengthen cooperation activities on NTIDs. In addition, this regional governance architecture on NTIDs has remained largely unaffected by the dramatic decline of interstate regionalism in South America, particularly exemplified by the collapse of the Union of South American Nations (UNASUR) in 2019. The emergence of this regional governance architecture is particularly linked to the renewed attention given to NTIDs by the WHO, PAHO and DNDi since the late 1990s. Almost all cross-border collaboration efforts on NTIDs developed by South American actors in the region since the 1990s have either been an integral part of these global efforts or have heavily been inspired by them.
Dr Markus Fraundorfer
5/11/2021 10:54:22 AM
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POLIS Research Seminar Series: The Party Politics of Northernness
Postgraduate Researcher Ryan Swift presented this talk as part of the Research Seminar Series hosted by the School of Politics and International Studies. Title: The Party Politics of Northernness Abstract: In recent years, the North of England has become increasingly salient in political debate. In particular, the focus on the North as part of the so-called ‘Red Wall’ at the 2019 general election and its place in subsequent government rhetoric on ‘levelling up’ has been significant. So too has the role of the North within debates around the government’s handling of the Coronavirus pandemic and the economic recovery from it. It is in this context that this paper explores the extent to which the increased political saliency of the North is currently being reflected within political parties at present. Specifically, it considers whether there is an emerging party politics of Northernness, characterised by issues based on perceptions of Northern distinction, or ideas of distinct Northern grievances being politicised regularly and in a coherent way by notable elements of political parties. The paper argues that there is some evidence of this taking place. For example, Labour’s metro mayors and council leaders across the North increasingly come together to speak on behalf of the region as a whole, and there has been some talk of a distinct ‘Northern Labour’ brand. Meanwhile, the formation of the Northern Research Group of Conservative MPs points towards a notable politicisation of the North within the Conservative Party. In exploring the prospects of this burgeoning party politics of Northernness, the paper demonstrates that the role of the North of England looks set to continue to be a notable issue of contestation within political debate, being politicised by actors across the political spectrum. It suggests that this could have interesting implications not only for the North in policy terms, but also on both inter-party competition in the North and intra-party centre-regional relations going forwards.
Ryan Swift
3/17/2021 1:00:06 PM
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Routes: A Social Science Enterprise Programme
Default Presenter
9/8/2021 10:59:55 AM
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The dangers of plagiarism
This short video explains what plagiarism is, how we detect it, and also how you can avoid committing the offence of plagiarism. Click on the links for further help from the Library Skills website or the Students Union
Dr Alexander Beresford
9/18/2015 2:57:48 PM
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Why use Twitter for teaching, learning and research?
A short video to highlight the significance of Twitter for our teaching, learning and research. There are also some useful links below from the Leeds library about how to manage your digital footprint should you need them.
Joy Robbins
10/25/2018 3:03:29 PM
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